Risk Of Self -Directed Violence

Risk Of Self -Directed Violence

Introduction to NANDA Nursing Diagnosis: Risk of Self-Directed Violence

NANDA nursing diagnosis is defined as a clinical judgement about individual, family, or group experiences/responses to actual or potential health problems/life processes. Risk of Self-Directed Violence is the potential for the individual to commit suicide and/or inflict harm upon oneself in any form. The diagnosis requires further clinical assessment with medical intervention and emergency services if needed.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

Risk of Self-Directed Violence is a nursing diagnosis based on the individual’s potential to deliberately injure oneself including physical aggression and/or suicide attempts.

Defining Characteristics

Subjectives

  • Expresses thoughts of self-harm verbally or through behavior.
  • Expresses suicidal or homicidal ideations.
  • Expresses intent to commit self-harm.
  • Provides limited or no insight into irrational thoughts or impulses.
  • Objectives

  • Engages in self-harming behaviors such as cutting, burning, hitting, or otherwise harming oneself.
  • Attempts or talks about committing suicide.
  • Possess objects/tools/weapons that could be used to harm oneself.
  • Demonstrates agitation,hyperactivity, and/or aggression.
  • Exhibits physiological symptoms such as changes in sleep patterns or appetite.

Related Factors

The related factors associated with creating a risk of self-directed violence are divided into personal, environmental, and social categories.

  • Personal – mental health diagnoses like depression, trauma, substance abuse, hallucinations, etc.
  • Environmental – access to firearms, no support system, and/or presence of influence from peers.
  • Social – poverty, family discord, academic failure, homelessness, discrimination, etc.

Risk Population

The following at-risk populations are most likely to be diagnosed with Risk of Self-Directed Violence according to NANDA nursing diagnosis:

  • Children, adolescents, and adults who have experienced physical, emotional, sexual, or financial abuse, mental illness, chronic health problems, substance use/abuse, or victimization
  • Individuals with a history of traumatic losses or bereavement, self-harm, or suicide attempts
  • People with mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders

Associated Problems

Associated problems may include:

  • Inability to cope with stressful situations
  • A sense of hopelessness or helplessness
  • Low self-esteem and self-worth
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Inability to care for oneself
  • Lack of life purpose
  • Impulsivity
  • Inability to regulate emotions

Suggestions for Use

Risk of Self-Directed Violence is a nursing diagnosis that can be used in conjunction with other nursing diagnoses and treatment plans. It should be used in conjunction with other mental health diagnoses to develop an appropriate treatment plan. Any interventions should focus on reducing the risk of self-harm and preventing suicide attempts.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Diagnoses

Alternative diagnoses may include:

  • Ineffective Coping
  • Readiness for Enhanced Self-Health Management
  • Risk for Dysfunctional Grieving
  • Risk for Suicide
  • Violence, Risk for Directed Toward Self

Usage Tips

  • Be aware of how labels and diagnostic terms create stigma and avoid reinforcing these by using person-centered language.
  • Partner with the client to develop an effective treatment plan and encourage communication of feelings.
  • Stay aware of any warning signs of self-directed violence.
  • Always follow the health care facility’s protocol and provide referrals to appropriate mental health services when indicated.
  • Remain as non-judgmental and non-biased as possible.

NOC Results

The NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) expected results for individuals diagnosed with Risk of Self-Directed Violence are:

  • Coping Effectiveness: the ability to cope with the stress of potential self-harm in a productive & healthy way.
  • Coping: Family: Compromise: the capability to engage in problem solving to arrive at mutually acceptable solutions to conflict.
  • Coping: Stress Tolerance: the capacity to handle negative emotions & obstacles encountered during crisis or stress.
  • Safety Status: minimizing the potential for self-harm & protecting one’s safety.

NIC Interventions

The NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) are interventions used to address Risk of Self-Directed Violence. These interventions may include, but are not limited to:

  • Counseling: helping the client to better understand their thoughts and actions.
  • Risk Identification: assessing the risk of harm and developing a safe environment.
  • Support System Facilitation: providing resources and connections to family, friends, and other supportive persons.
  • Crisis Intervention: intervening during a crisis moment to help increase safety and well-being.

Conclusion

NANDA nursing diagnosis Risk of Self-Directed Violence is a diagnosis that requires close clinical assessment and interventions. It is important to listen to the client and partner with them in order to work towards solutions that will reduce their risk of self-harm and optimize their safety status. Proper interventions and referrals can help to reduce the risk of self-directed violence.

FAQ

  • What does the “Risk of Self-Directed Violence” NANDA Nursing Diagnosis mean?
  • The “Risk of Self-Directed Violence” NANDA Nursing Diagnosis is a clinical judgement about an individual, family, or group experiences/responses to actual or potential health problems/life processes. It is based on the individual’s potential to deliberately injure oneself including physical aggression and/or suicide attempts.

  • Which populations are most at risk for this diagnosis?
  • The following at-risk populations are most likely to be diagnosed with Risk of Self-Directed Violence according to NANDA nursing diagnosis: children, adolescents, and adults who have experienced physical, emotional, sexual, or financial abuse, mental illness, chronic health problems, substance use/abuse, or victimization; individuals with a history of traumatic losses or bereavement, self-harm, or suicide attempts; people with mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders.

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