Urinary Incontinence Associated With Disability

Urinary Incontinence Associated With Disability

Introduction To NANDA Nursing Diagnosis: Urinary Incontinence Associated With Disability

NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) nursing diagnosis labels are needed to develop and define the best medical care for a person. They are part of the international standardized language developed by nursing professionals.

The NANDA nursing diagnosis ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated With Disability’ is defined as the state in which the patient is unable to control their bladder due to a disability of some form. This can affect all age groups, but is more common in individuals with physical and mental disabilities.

NANDA Nursing Diagnosis Definition

The NANDA nursing diagnosis definition for ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ is:
The inability to control voiding of urine, caused by a disability.

Defining Characteristics

Subjective


  • Verbalization of loss of bladder control or wetting episodes

  • Verbalization of leakage of urine

  • Use of absorbent materials to control urine leakage


Objective


  • Observed involuntary urinary incontinence

  • Absence of urge before incontinence episodes

  • Presence of skin lesions or abrasions due to frequent incontinence episodes


Related Factors


These can include physiological, neurological or psycho-social factors, such as:

  • Impaired sensation or perception of bladder fullness

  • Inability to initiate or suppress micturition reflexes

  • Decreased sphincter control

  • Bladder outlet obstruction

  • Medications and/or herbal supplements

Additionally, associated with physical or mental disability conditions such as cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, dementia, etc., may also play a role.

Risk Population

At risk populations for ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ include individuals suffering from any physical or mental disability, as well as those with compromised mobility or sensory deficits.

Associated Problems

Clients with ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ may be at risk of problems such as:

  • Skin irritation, breakdown and infection
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Fecal impaction or uncontrolled bowel movements
  • Lack of independence or social withdrawal
  • Loss of dignity and self-esteem

Suggestions of Use

NANDA nursing diagnosis of ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ can assist nurses in providing individuals suffering from any physical or mental disability with proper care and treatment. Additionally, it can also inform healthcare providers with documenting accurate information about the patient’s condition as well as assessing the efficacy of treatments and interventions.

Suggested Alternative NANDA Diagnoses

Alternative NANDA nursing diagnoses related to ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ include:

  • Risk for infection

  • Ineffective Self-Health Management

  • Impaired Skin Integrity
  • Disturbed Body Image


Usage Tips

When using the NANDA diagnosis ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ it is important to remember that it can only assist in the assessment process, but cannot replace the necessity for a comprehensive individual health assessment. Additionally, it should be used in conjunction with other pertinent diagnoses.

NOC Results


The following NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification) outcomes can be expected after implementing the NANDA nursing diagnosis for ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’:

  • Continence Status

  • Skin Integrity

  • Body Image

  • Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living

  • Knowledge: Health Behaviour
  • Social Interaction


Continence Status

This outcome is measured by the degree to which a patient is able to control his/her bladder.

Skin Integrity

This outcome is measured by the degree of skin impairment caused by urinary incontinence episodes.

Body Image

This outcome is measured by the degree to which a patient perceives him/herself in terms of self-confidence and self-esteem.

Self-Care: Activities of Daily Living

This outcome is measured by the patient’s ability to perform daily activities independently.

Knowledge: Health Behaviour

This outcome is measured by the degree to which the patient understands how to take care of him/herself.

Social Interaction

This outcome measures the degree to which the patient is able to interact in social settings.

NIC Interventions

The following NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification) interventions may be appropriate when treating a patient with ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’:

  • Maintain Continence

  • Reduce Risk of Skin Breakdown

  • Provide Care After Bowel/Bladder Training

  • Assess for Signs of Dehydration
  • Supportive/Reinforcing Therapy

  • Encourage Self-Care


Conclusion

NANDA nursing diagnosis of ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ assists nurses as well as other healthcare providers in determining an appropriate care plan and treatment protocol for patients affected by any physical or mental disability. Although this diagnosis is helpful in guiding healthcare decisions, it should never replace the need for a comprehensive individual assessment or used in isolation.

FAQ

  • What is NANDA nursing diagnosis? -NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) nursing diagnosis labels are needed to develop and define the best medical care for a person. They are part of the international standardized language developed by nursing professionals.
  • What is the definition of the NANDA nursing diagnosis ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’? -The NANDA nursing diagnosis definition for ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ is: The inability to control voiding of urine, caused by a disability.
  • What are the risk populations associated with this diagnosis? -At risk populations for ‘Urinary Incontinence Associated with Disability’ include individuals suffering from any physical or mental disability, as well as those with compromised mobility or sensory deficits.

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